Tuesday, August 02, 2011

Home vacancies cause long-term damage. Luckily, they are declining.

CNBC's Diana Olick four days ago:
A new study by an economist at the Cleveland Federal Reserve finds today's foreclosures stay vacant far longer than the historical norm. Studying one Ohio county, Stephan Whitaker found, "foreclosed homes go through more than a year of very high vacancy rates following the auction and are substantially more likely to be vacant up to 60 months after the foreclosure." The higher the poverty rate in the area, the longer the property stays vacant.

Foreclosed homes obviously lower the value of surrounding homes, but Whitaker says the damage can go on much longer than we might think. "The data suggest that foreclosure may permanently scar some homes," he writes in his research.
The Wall Street Journal yesterday:
Fewer homes in the U.S. are sitting empty than earlier in the year. Residential vacancy rates ticked down during the second quarter from the first quarter as well as the year-ago period, to 9.2% for rental properties and 2.5% for privately owned homes. Both are below their recession-era levels but reflect continued weakness in the housing market.

1 comment:

  1. Long term blog vacancy causes traffic damage... You seem to have a loyal re-tweeting set of followers, but how many are realtors you so deride...?